Hurricane protection on 3 levels

hurricane protection boats cars and rv

Hurricane protection on 3 levels

Hurricane Help

Advice and explanation on three levels of protection.

Car Care

Before the storm:

• Prepare to leave town. While no one wants to accept the possibility of needing to evacuate, it’s still important to be prepared. Before the first storm is forecast, here are some tips to get ahead of the curve.
• Plan an evacuation route
• Pack the trunk with essential items, some may include:
o First aid kit
o Food
o Water
o Flashlight with batteries
o Battery or hand crank radio
o Prescription medication

A storm is coming

• If a storm has been forecast to make landfall in your area, more preparation is required. This is where things get overlooked. Too many of us hope that the forecast will change, and if it doesn’t, you’re that much farther behind.
• Be prepared during the forecast by:
o Filling up the gas tank
o Checking windshield wiper blades to see if they’re in good shape
o Making sure all tires (including the spare) are inflated properly
o Placing auto and home documents, registrations, titles and other important documents in a waterproof bag and keep them with you
o Charging your cell phone
• If you plan to leave the car behind, make sure it is not in a flood-prone area
• Evacuate when instructed to

Evacuation and returning

• Whether you’re on the way out of town or on the way back in, the path you’re used to traveling may be impacted by the weather. Here are some traveling safety tips to get through the tougher areas:
o Avoid deep water. The average car can be swept off the road in as little as a foot of moving water; find a different route.
o If your vehicle stalls in water, you may need to restart it to reach safety. Be aware that this may severely damage your engine.
o If you cannot restart the car, and become trapped in rising water, abandon the car and seek higher ground. If you cannot get out safely, call 911 or look for help in your surroundings.
o After driving your car through deep water, pump the brakes a few times slowly to help them dry

Boat

Be prepared to leave the boat behind. Whether it’s docked, anchored or stored at a high and dry we’ve got advice for all scenarios.

Docked

• Double up on chafe protection
• Double all lines
• Attach lines high on pilings

Anchored

• Use enough line to accommodate storm surge
• Do not tie up parallel to the shore
• Leave plenty of room around your boat
• Clear self-bailing cockpit drains
• Use multiple anchors

Dry storage

• Place the boat higher than expected storm surge
• Unplug and clear drains
• If on a trailer, secure wheels in place with wedges

RV

Preparing for a hurricane as an RV owner is similar to the preparation above for car owners, but with a few tweaks.

Before the storm

• Prepare an evacuation route
• Pack essential items:
o First aid kit
o Food
o Water
o Flashlight with batteries
o Battery or hand crank radio
o Prescription medication
• Specifically for RV owners, perform a safety check. If you use gas lanterns or a gas stove, be sure to have battery-powered smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

A Storm is coming

• Get a full tank of gas
• Check windshield wiper blade wear; consider replacing
• Place important documents, registration, titles, insurance documents, etc., in a waterproof bag and keep them with you
• Charge your cell phone
• Empty the holding tanks, turn propane off and cover the regulator
• If you plan to leave the RV behind, make sure it is in an area that can survive flooding.

Evacuation and Returning

• Don’t drive during a hurricane. The size and weight distribution makes RVs prone to overturning in high winds
• If you must drive through water, do so slowly. If your vehicle stalls in water, you may need to restart it to reach safety. Be aware that this may severely damage your engine.
• If you cannot restart the RV, and become trapped in rising water, abandon the vehicle and seek higher ground. If you cannot get out safely, call 911 or look for help in your surroundings.
• After driving your RV through deep water, pump the brakes a few times slowly to help them dry

At AWS Insurance, we know that when disaster strikes the cost of necessary treatment and repair can be very expensive; this can be devastating to your family and your financial freedom. That’s why our experts want to work with you to build an insurance policy that meets your budget and protects your family.

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Melinda Martin

Account Executive

Melinda began her insurance career in 1985 with Alexander & Alexander where she received her Property & Casualty and Life & Health license. Since then she has worked at various agencies in the New Orleans area and in California as a senior account manager for Employee Benefit Plans.  While in California, she was also the Membership Director for the Burbank Chamber of Commerce. Melinda joined the AWS team in July of 2015.

Michael A. Seeling

Vice President

Graduated from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette with a B.A. in Insurance Risk Management and is a graduate of Archbishop Rummel High School in New Orleans. He joined AWS in October of 2008 and has been awarded the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Certification (PPACA). Additionally, he is working towards his Certified Insurance Counselor (CIC), Registered Health Underwriter (RHU), and Registered Employee Benefits Consultant (REBC) designations. He is also a member of the National Association of Health Underwriters (NAHU), National Association of Insurance Financial Advisors (NAIFA), and is an active member of the Fore!Kids foundation.